History Schmistory: February 16. “Are you a gameshow panelist?”

1950: The longest-running prime time game show in network television history, What’s My Line?, premieres on CBS, and runs until 1967. The show consisted of a semi-witty celebrity panel that attempted to guess the typically unusual occupations of various guests by way of yes or no questions. (As in ‘what’s my line of work?’ not to be confused with Whose Line is it Anyway?) Shows also included “mystery guests” which the panelists were challenged to identify while napping…

History Schmistory: February 16. Emergency!

February 16, 1968. 9-1-1 service begins.

GO THERE! Chalk it up!

Everybody knows about the Pyramids in Egypt but there are plenty of natural wonders to explore as well. Twenty-eight miles north of the village of Farafra lies the Sahara el Beyda, or White Desert, with its crazy chalk rock formations throughout, caused by sandstorms and low-level wind erosion.
-and frumpy schoolteachers who maintain stockpiles for their blackboards :)

History Schmistory: February 15. Compute this!

1946: ENIAC, the first electronic general-purpose computer, is formally dedicated at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. The ENIAC (electronic numerical integrator and computer) filled an entire room, weighed thirty tons, and consumed over two hundred kilowatts of power, (1 kW=1000 regular watts) so clearly the room must have felt like a sauna. Parts included over 19,000 vacuum tubes -the principal elements of the circuitry- and hundreds of thousands of resistors, capacitors, and inductors, all jumbled up inside forty-two panels nine feet tall, two feet wide, and one foot thick. And not a mouse to be found!

It would be decades before the true potential of the computer would be realized…

History Schmistory: February 15. Words From Columbus!

February 15, 1493. Columbus writes a letter describing (and exaggerating) his voyage.

Happy Valentine’s Day!

Video Schmistory: February 14.

History Schmistory: February 13. “I give up.”

1633: After a grueling twenty-three day trip, Italian astronomer Galileo Galilei, seventy years old and suffering from excruciating sciatica, arrives in Rome for his trial before the Inquisition. Having failed to convince the cardinals with his evidence, Galileo was to be tried for heresy for professing and detailing his belief that Earth revolves around the Sun. In order to avoid a particularly torturous jail sentence, the mark of any bona fide Inquisition, Galileo had no choice but to submit, renouncing his beliefs and denying a lifetime of work so he could go back home and live out his remaining days in peace.

Some folks were just too far ahead of their time…

History Schmistory: February 13. We Do Covers!

February 13, 1867. The Polluted River Zenne gets a cover-up.

Valentine’s Day Around the World Video!

Learn how they celebrate love in Scotland, Japan, Korea, France, Germany, Denmark, Singapore, Finland, England, and Italy!

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