History Schmistory: August 4. It was good to be Queen -Mother

1900: Queen Elizabeth, ‘the Queen Mother’ is born. Not to be confused with Elizabeth II, who will most likely live forever.

By Allan warren (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0) or GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html)], via Wikimedia Commons

By Allan warren (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0) or GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html)], via Wikimedia Commons

History Schmistory: August 3. La Scala-kazam!

1778: La Scala Opera House opens in Milan, Italy, with a show by F. Murray Abraham’s character in Amadeus.
By ungenannt [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

By ungenannt [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Speaking of mediocre composers, here’s a Marco classic!

History Schmistory: August 2. Bay of Henry?

1610: Explorer Henry Hudson enters the bay later named after him, the Hudson Bay. Since his crew mutinied and left him for dead, an apology card was also in order. It’s in a bottle, floating out there somewhere. Sorry Hud!

By Neemster (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

By Neemster (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

History Schmistory: August 1. Breathe, durn-it!

1774: Oxygen is ‘discovered’ by Britain’s Sir Joseph Priestly, and given a symbol (O), though most refer to it as “the substance formerly known as air.”
By penner (http://flickr.com/photos/penner/2450784866) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0) or GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html)], via Wikimedia Commons

By penner (http://flickr.com/photos/penner/2450784866) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0) or GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html)], via Wikimedia Commons

History Schmistory: July 31. Houston, the Nina has landed.

1498: Christopher Columbus and crew arrive in Trinidad. What do they bring back? …Syphilis.
'Columbus landing at Trinidad', From Famous Voyagers and Explorers, 1893, The British Library [public domain]

‘Columbus landing at Trinidad’, From Famous Voyagers and Explorers, 1893, The British Library [public domain]

 

 

History Schmistory: July 30. “Eat it, gravity!”

1918: The first parachute jump from a perfectly good aircraft, performed with flair by Frenchmen Sarret.
Here goes nothing!  V.Leers (De prins der geillustreerde bladen) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Here goes nothing!
V.Leers (De prins der geillustreerde bladen) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

History Schmistory: July 29. The Final Frontier…

1958: President Dwight D. Eisenhower eagerly signs a federal statute that creates the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA).

To infinity and beyond!   By Bill Ingalls [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

To infinity and beyond!
By Bill Ingalls [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sadly, they were never able to get him back to his home planet.

History Schmistory: July 28. This spud’s for you.

1586: The Potato is introduced into Britain from America. It quickly adopts a flawless British accent.

'How do you do?"

‘How do you do?”

History Schmistory: July 27. Lend me your ears…..

1890: Vincent van Gogh shoots himself; he dies two days later. Insert ear joke here.

'Self Portrait'  Vincent van Gogh [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

‘Self Portrait’
Vincent van Gogh [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

History Schmistory: July 26. Mi Vidi Vi!

1887: Unua Libro  is published, detailing the language of Esperanto, Now spoken in over 100 countries. Who knew? …I sure didn’t.
By skanita en privata biblioteko de P.Fiŝo (Wikipedia/eo) [CC0], via Wikimedia Commons

By skanita en privata biblioteko de P.Fiŝo (Wikipedia/eo) [CC0], via Wikimedia Commons

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fun Fact: Esperanto was the brain child of Dr. Ludwig Lazarus Zamenhof and was designed as a ‘universal language’ that would help foster global connections and communication. Unfortunately it was not the success Zamenhof had hoped. Today only 10,000, in the whole world, speak it fluently. Commiseration’s Dr. Z

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