GO THERE! …or wait until it’s finished.

The Sanctuary of Truth is a temple in Pattaya, Thailand, visualized by Thai businessman Lek Viriyaphant in 1981. The sanctuary is an all-wood building filled with Visionary art carvings based on traditional Buddhist and Hindu motifs. A team of 250 carvers contribute to the project, which is technically not scheduled to be completed until 2025. But at this point we think it’s awesome enough to check out as is.

History Schmistory: February 20. Hofer heaven’s sake!

1810: Andreas Hofer, a humble Tirolean innkeeper turned patriot, who became the leader of a rebellion against Napoleon’s forces, is executed by firing squad under Napoleon’s order to “give him a fair trial, then shoot him.” Hofer refused a blindfold, passing money to the corporal with orders to “shoot straight”. In his final letter Hofer proclaimed; “Goodbye disappearing world! Dying is so easy that my eyes have no tears.” Today he is regarded as a national hero in Tirol and much of Austria and Germany. Even has a four star hotel named after him. As a former innkeeper, he probably would appreciate that.

Art Stop: Trucking Around the World

Russian artist, Andrey Gordeev takes us on a unique journey with his series,  Around the World in Twelve Months, where we see the world from the perspective of the indispensable truck driver. Stereotypes lovingly included :)



View the whole series here!

History Schmistory: February 19. It’s people!!

1847: The first group of rescuers reaches the Donner Party. Sadly, they arrived just after the main course.

History Schmistory: February 18. Moooovin’ on up.

1930: Elm Farm Ollie, aka “Nellie Jay” becomes the first cow to fly in a fixed-wing aircraft, promoting the International Air Exposition in St. Louis, Missouri.
Ollie was also the first cow to be milked in an aircraft, producing 24 quarts of milk which were parachuted in cartons down to eager spectators.
Unfortunately, the air-milk industry failed to thrive.

 

History Schmistory: February 17. Orange you glad we’re a free state?

1854: The United Kingdom recognizes the independence of the Orange Free State, which would later become a part of the Union of South Africa. Today the province remains free from the tyranny of Oranges.

History Schmistory: February 16. “Are you a gameshow panelist?”

1950: The longest-running prime time game show in network television history, What’s My Line?, premieres on CBS, and runs until 1967. The show consisted of a semi-witty celebrity panel that attempted to guess the typically unusual occupations of various guests by way of yes or no questions. (As in ‘what’s my line of work?’ not to be confused with Whose Line is it Anyway?) Shows also included “mystery guests” which the panelists were challenged to identify while napping…

History Schmistory: February 16. Emergency!

February 16, 1968. 9-1-1 service begins.

GO THERE! Chalk it up!

Everybody knows about the Pyramids in Egypt but there are plenty of natural wonders to explore as well. Twenty-eight miles north of the village of Farafra lies the Sahara el Beyda, or White Desert, with its crazy chalk rock formations throughout, caused by sandstorms and low-level wind erosion.
-and frumpy schoolteachers who maintain stockpiles for their blackboards :)

History Schmistory: February 15. Compute this!

1946: ENIAC, the first electronic general-purpose computer, is formally dedicated at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. The ENIAC (electronic numerical integrator and computer) filled an entire room, weighed thirty tons, and consumed over two hundred kilowatts of power, (1 kW=1000 regular watts) so clearly the room must have felt like a sauna. Parts included over 19,000 vacuum tubes -the principal elements of the circuitry- and hundreds of thousands of resistors, capacitors, and inductors, all jumbled up inside forty-two panels nine feet tall, two feet wide, and one foot thick. And not a mouse to be found!

It would be decades before the true potential of the computer would be realized…

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