Ludicrous Latin: Non, mihi ignosce, credo me insequentem esse

No, excuse me, I believe I’m next.

Ludicrous Latin: Caesar si viveret, ad remum dareris.

If Caesar were alive, you’d be chained to an oar!

Ludicrous Latin: Noli me vocate, ego te vocabo.

Don’t call me, I’ll call you

Ludicrous Latin: Sona si latine loqueris.

Honk if you speak Latin.

Ludicrous Latin: Non curo. Si metrum non habet, non est poema.

I don’t care. If it doesn’t rhyme, it isn’t a poem.

Viral Marco: A really cute kid speaks French!

History Schmistory: January 28. “Dear Horace, I just had a happy accident.”

1754: The first use of the word “serendipity” in the English language is noted in a letter from Horace Walpole to Horace Mann. A letter between Horaces! Walpole said he formed it from the Persian fairy tale The Three Princes of Serendip, whose heroes “were always making discoveries, by accidents and sagacity, of things they were not in quest of”. Mann convinced Walpole to truncate the fledgling term from the original; “Serendipity-doo-dah.”

Serendipity by Nila Sivatheesan, April 7, 2014 via Flickr, Creative Commons Attribution.

Serendipity by Nila Sivatheesan, April 7, 2014 via Flickr, Creative Commons Attribution.

MarcoWord (French): Joyeux Noël (Merry Christmas)

Today’s MarcoWord (French): Joyeux Noël. Merry Christmas. Joyeux Noël, my French friend. Whoa, change one letter and ‘French friend’ looks like ‘French Fried!’ Cool!”

 

https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3684/9091892987_fe5cea6f0a_o.jpg

Grocerymania, Joyeux Noel Metro 1960, via flick, creative commons contribution

 

MarcoWord (German): Fröhliche Weihnachten (Merry Christmas)

Today’s MarcoWord (German): Fröhliche Weihnachten. Merry Christmas. Fröhliche Weihnachten! Can I pay in Euros?”

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Today’s MarcoWord (Indonesian): Selamat Hari Natal (Merry Christmas)

Today’s MarcoWord (Indonesian): Selamat Hari Natal. Merry Christmas. Selamat Hari Natal, fellow Indonesioners!”

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