History Schmistory: July 26. Mi Vidi Vi!

1887: Unua Libro  is published, detailing the language of Esperanto, Now spoken in over 100 countries. Who knew? …I sure didn’t.
By skanita en privata biblioteko de P.Fiŝo (Wikipedia/eo) [CC0], via Wikimedia Commons

By skanita en privata biblioteko de P.Fiŝo (Wikipedia/eo) [CC0], via Wikimedia Commons

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fun Fact: Esperanto was the brain child of Dr. Ludwig Lazarus Zamenhof and was designed as a ‘universal language’ that would help foster global connections and communication. Unfortunately it was not the success Zamenhof had hoped. Today only 10,000, in the whole world, speak it fluently. Commiseration’s Dr. Z

History Schmistory, July 15: Roc-King Out!

1799 – The Rosetta Stone was found in the Egyptian village of Rosetta by French Captain Pierre-François Bouchard during Napoleon’s Egyptian Campaign. It unfortunately did not give them the ability learn a new language online. It did however have three different languages written on it (Greek, Demotic & Hieroglyphic!)

 

Before internet was invented...

Before internet was invented…

History Schmistory, July 9: Hear Yee, Hear Yee! Yo, LISTEN UP!

1776 - Declaration of Independence was read to George Washington’s troops in New York. I am sure some must have wondered why they were still following the leader after they were told they were free.  After all, they now had the unalienable right to life which war could take away.

Washington and Lafayette look over the troops at Valley Forge. [public domain]

Washington and Lafayette look over the troops at Valley Forge. [public domain]

Today’s Latin Phrase: Utinam barbari spatium proprium tuum invadant!

May barbarians invade your personal space!

Viral Marco: A really cute kid speaks French!

History Schmistory: January 28. “Dear Horace, I just had a happy accident.”

1754: The first use of the word “serendipity” in the English language is noted in a letter from Horace Walpole to Horace Mann. A letter between Horaces! Walpole said he formed it from the Persian fairy tale The Three Princes of Serendip, whose heroes “were always making discoveries, by accidents and sagacity, of things they were not in quest of”. Mann convinced Walpole to truncate the fledgling term from the original; “Serendipity-doo-dah.”

Serendipity by Nila Sivatheesan, April 7, 2014 via Flickr, Creative Commons Attribution.

Serendipity by Nila Sivatheesan, April 7, 2014 via Flickr, Creative Commons Attribution.

History Schmistory: September 4. La La Land!

1781: Los Angeles, California is founded as El Pueblo de Nuestra Senora La Reina de los Angeles de Porciuncula,  (The Village of Our Lady, the Queen of the Angels of Porziuncola), which seems like a silly name for a city, until you see this…

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photo by Eyreland (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Here are some more ridiculously long city names. Shouldn’t there be a limit? How irritating would it be to have to send a package to Taumatawhakatangihangakoauauotamateaturipukakapikimaungahoronukupokaiwhenuakitanatahu?

MarcoWord (French): Joyeux Noël (Merry Christmas)

Today’s MarcoWord (French): Joyeux Noël. Merry Christmas. Joyeux Noël, my French friend. Whoa, change one letter and ‘French friend’ looks like ‘French Fried!’ Cool!”

 

https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3684/9091892987_fe5cea6f0a_o.jpg

Grocerymania, Joyeux Noel Metro 1960, via flick, creative commons contribution

 

MarcoWord (German): Fröhliche Weihnachten (Merry Christmas)

Today’s MarcoWord (German): Fröhliche Weihnachten. Merry Christmas. Fröhliche Weihnachten! Can I pay in Euros?”

christmas-market-612706_640

Today’s MarcoWord (Indonesian): Selamat Hari Natal (Merry Christmas)

Today’s MarcoWord (Indonesian): Selamat Hari Natal. Merry Christmas. Selamat Hari Natal, fellow Indonesioners!”

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